Mission Accomplished: Stop The Clock

By Muriel P. Engelman

                            BOOK SUMMARY

                                        

                              

                     

                 

 

 

Muriel Engelman’s extraordinary life stories are visualized from her earliest childhood memories over eighty years ago to the present.

 

She begins her fascinating narrative detailing her fascinating journey through childhood in Connecticut during the Great Depression and through her student years in the Boston area. Her structured life experiences as a student nurse are spelled out in colorful and comical fashion and this same inimitable style carries over into her stories about her years as an army nurse. The horrors of war are also brought out at this time when life wasn’t all fun and games.

 

Lighter off-duty moments balanced out the threat of capture during the Battle of the Bulge and living under continuous buzz bomb bombardment, all while caring for wounded American soldiers.  This is described in excerpts from actual letters penned to her family, often written by the dim light of a kerosene lantern or flashlight, knowing as she wrote that survival was not a guaranteed possibility.

 

Muriel shares vivid descriptions of the people, settings and memories in a timeless style that will transport everyone back to an era when the future of the world was uncertain and the bravery of those who sacrificed everything to protect America was not forgotten.

 

Her post-war stories, which comprise about two-thirds of the book, are oftentimes hilarious, detailing in a breezy manner her experiences in day-to-day living as well as in extensive foreign travel encounters before Europe and Asia became westernized.

 

We laugh through Muriel learning to ski; getting picked up by a handsome Italian or becoming an authority on different types of toileting, and we empathize with her when writing to the parents of a dead soldier patient, or when faced with the care of a mother-in-law diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease.

 

Happy or sad, each story only whets the reader’s interest for more.